THIS SNOWPACK SUMMARY EXPIRED ON April 5, 2017 @ 11:20 am
Snowpack Summary published on April 2, 2017 @ 11:20 am
Issued by Ryan Lewthwaite -

bottom line:

Clear skies & warming afternoon temperatures will effect the uppermost snow surface. Morning ice covered slopes give way to afternoon rapid thawing & wet loose avalanches are possible. Wind deposited snow has accumulated on South & Southwest aspects in terrain traps & as cornices. Use particular caution on slopes steeper than 35 degrees that have warmed in the mid-day sunshine as unstable conditions may exist. Hwy 108 has become a patchwork of snow & asphalt from People's Gate to Leavitt Pack Station with numerous wash-out zones. Please do not attempt to drive towards Leavitt Pack Station, deep snow will swallow your vehicle. Creeks all across the BWRA are resurfacing & munching away at the snow around them, expect depressions to be hollow underneath.

Avalanche Character 1: Loose Wet
Loose Wet avalanches occur when water is running through the snowpack, and release at or below the trigger point. Avoid very steep slopes and terrain traps such as cliffs, gullies, or tree wells. Exit avalanche terrain when you see pinwheels, roller balls, a slushy surface, or during rain-on-snow events.

Afternoon temperatures climbing into the low & mid 40s, combined with intense solar radiation will make surface snow wet, loose & unstable. If you notice dripping cornices, the ability to squeeze water out of a handful of snow, or slushy & easily penetrated old surface snow take warning. Rapid warming will change the physical properties of snow, destroying bonds & creating loose-wet avalanche possibilities.

Avalanche Character 2: Wind Slab
Wind Slab avalanches release naturally during wind events and can be triggered for up to a week after a wind event. They form in lee and cross-loaded terrain features. Avoid them by sticking to wind sheltered or wind scoured areas.

Thursday's new 10cm of wind blown snow has created slabs & scoured other terrain. Friday's winds out of the North & Northeast were uncommon & have loaded South & Southwest aspects. The irregularity of the winds has deposited snow in areas that usually are barren & coincidentally cornices have formed too. The wind slabs have not yet shown much reactiveness.

Snowpack Discussion

We received 10cm of new wind-blown snow Thursday night. The winds were strong from the North & Northwest forming slabs & cornices. The new snow was still relatively soft due to warm temperatures & did not produce any alarming results when tested. Moist snow & some water was seen in the first 15cm of the snowpack making penetration with boot & snowmobile easy. Our snowpack is still very thick & overall has a relatively stable characteristic.

weather

A weak disturbance will bring a chance of light showers today through Monday morning with some cooling. Dry and warmer conditions will return through the middle of next week, then a change to a wetter pattern with gusty winds is becoming more likely later in the week through next weekend, with heavy rain and mountain snow possible.

Two-Day Mountain Weather Forecast Produced in partnership with the Reno NWS
For 8000 ft. to 10000 ft.
  Sunday Sunday Night Monday
Weather: Sunny Mostly cloudy. Slight chance of showers Mostly cloudy then becoming partly cloudy. Chance of snow showers in the morning, then slight chance of snow showers in the afternoon
Temperatures: 38-44 deg. F. 25-31 deg. F. 32-38 deg. F.
Wind direction: NA NA NW
Wind speed: Light Light winds. Gusts up to 25 mph after midnight Northwest 15 to 20 mph. Gusts up to 30 mph increasing to 45 mph in the afternoon
Expected snowfall: 0 in. 1 in. 1 in.
For above 10000 ft.
  Sunday Sunday Night Monday
Weather: Sunny Mostly cloudy. Slight chance of snow showers in the evening, then chance of snow showers after midnight Mostly cloudy then becoming partly cloudy. Chance of snow showers in the morning, then slight chance of snow showers in the afternoon
Temperatures: 34-40 deg. F. 19-25 deg. F. 26-32 deg. F.
Wind direction: NW NW NW
Wind speed: Northwest 10 to 15 mph with gusts to 30 mph Northwest 10 to 15 mph. Gusts up to 35 mph after midnight Northwest 20 to 30 mph. Gusts up to 45 mph increasing to 55 mph in the afternoon
Expected snowfall: 0 in. 1 in. 1 in.
Disclaimer

This snowpack summary applies only to backcountry areas in the Bridgeport Winter Recreation Area. Click here for a map of the area. This snowpack summary describes general avalanche conditions and local variations always occur. This snowpack summary expires in 48 hours unless otherwise noted. The information in this snowpack summary is provided by the USDA Forest Service who is solely responsible for its content.